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Resources and Studies

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This resources and studies section contains key projects and studies completed by Regional Planning in recent years. Although this is not a comprehensive list, if you do not see the project you are looking for please contact regionalplanning@metrovancouver.org to request further information or resources.
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Metro 2050 Executive Summaryhttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-2050-executive-summary.pdfMetro 2050 Executive SummaryAn executive summary of Metro 2050, the Regional Growth Strategy. This 4-page document provides an overview of the vision, principles, goals, strategies, targets, and new policies in Metro 2050.
Japanese Beetle Guidebookhttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/japanese-beetle-guidebook.pdfJapanese Beetle GuidebookThe impacts of invasive species on ecological, human, and economic health are of concern in the Metro Vancouver region. Successful control of invasive species requires concerted and targeted efforts by many participants. This document - “Guidebook for Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) in the Metro Vancouver Region” - is one of a series of species-specific guides developed for use by practitioners (e.g., local government staff, crews, project managers, contractors, consultants, developers, stewardship groups, and others who have a role in invasive species management) in this region.
Urban Tree List for Metro Vancouver in a Changing Climate https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/urban-forest-trees-list.pdfUrban Tree List for Metro Vancouver in a Changing Climate An easy to download and print list of over 300 tree species assessed for suitability to the current and projected future climate in the Metro Vancouver region. Essentially a short version of the trees listed in the database.
European Chafer Beetle Fact Sheethttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/european-chafer-beetle-fact-sheet.pdfEuropean Chafer Beetle Fact SheetEuropean chafer beetles were first discovered in British Columbia in 2001 in lawns and turfgrass. They have since spread across the Metro Vancouver region. The beetles can spread quickly because they have a short life cycle and can fly. They can also be spread in infested soil, grass and garden plants.
Metro Vancouver Growth Projections 2021https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-vancouver-growth-projections-tables.pdfMetro Vancouver Growth Projections 2021Vew the Metro Vancouver Growth Projections. This includes population, dwelling unit, employment, and geography.
Metro 2050https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-2050.pdfMetro 2050Metro Vancouver’s Regional Growth Strategy, Metro 2050, is a long-range vision for how the region will manage population, dwelling unit, and employment growth forecasted to come to this region over the next 30 years. It contains goals, strategies, and policies to shape and accommodate growth in a way that supports the development of a compact urban area and complete communities, and which protects important lands such as Conservation and Recreation, Agricultural, Industrial, and Rural lands.
Regional Tree Canopy Cover and Impervious Surface in Metro Vancouver 2020https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/regional-tree-canopy-cover-impervious-surface-2020.pdfRegional Tree Canopy Cover and Impervious Surface in Metro Vancouver 2020A technical report of the results of Metro Vancouver's tree canopy cover, impervious surface, and potential planting area analysis for 2020 and compares the findings to those from 2014.
European Chafer Beetle Best Management Practiceshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/european-chafer-beetle-best-management-practices.pdfEuropean Chafer Beetle Best Management PracticesAs researchers and practitioners learn more about the biology and control of European chafer beetle in British Columbia, it is anticipated that the recommended best management practices may change over time and this document will be updated.
Himalayan Blackberry Fact Sheethttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/himalayan-blackberry-fact-sheet.pdfHimalayan Blackberry Fact SheetHimalayan blackberry was first introduced to BC as a berry crop. This plant can grow almost anywhere. It spreads by seed (from birds and people spreading berries) and by rooting from stems that touch the ground. As a result, it is one of the most widespread invasive plants in Metro Vancouver.
Hedge Bindweed Fact Sheethttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/hedge-bindweed-fact-sheet.pdfHedge Bindweed Fact SheetHedge bindweed, also known as morning glory, is a familiar sight from spring through fall in urban parks and gardens in Metro Vancouver. It is found twining around other plants and structures, often forming a tangled mass. It is a persistent plant that spreads by underground stems and roots that can resprout from fragments left in the soil.
Metro 2050 Map 1 - Metro Vancouver Regionhttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-2050-map-1.pdfMetro 2050 Map 1 - Metro Vancouver RegionView the Regional Growth Strategy - Metro Vancouver Region map.
Invasive Species and Toxic Plant Disposal Options for Practitioners and Commercial Customershttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/invasive-species-toxic-plant-disposal-options.pdfInvasive Species and Toxic Plant Disposal Options for Practitioners and Commercial CustomersThe following list is intended for use by practitioners and commercial customers, not by residents. Residents who wish to dispose of invasive plants or soil containing invasive species should contact their municipality directly for disposal advice.
Metro Vancouver Housing Data Book 2023https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-vancouver-housing-data-book-2023.pdfMetro Vancouver Housing Data Book 2023The Metro Vancouver Housing Data Book brings together a large collection of regional and municipal level data from a variety of sources in order to provide a comprehensive look at the region's housing market and the people impacted by it.
Metro 2050 Mapshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-2050-maps.pdfMetro 2050 MapsView Metro 2050, the Regional Growth Strategy maps.
Metro Vancouver Growth Projections - Methodology Report 2021https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-vancouver-growth-projections-methodology-report.pdfMetro Vancouver Growth Projections - Methodology Report 2021Projection modelling is intended to promote collaboration and consistency among provincial, regional, and municipal planning agencies and establish a common basis of information, assumptiosn, and growth and policy implementation methods. This methodology report was created in 2021.
Knotweeds Fact Sheethttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/knotweeds-fact-sheet.pdfKnotweeds Fact SheetKnotweeds are aggressive plants that were introduced from regions in Asia. They are some of the most destructive invasive plants in the world and are considered a high priority to manage.
2023 Survey of Licensed Child Care Spaces and Policies in Metro Vancouver https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/survey-of-licensed-child-care-spaces-in-metro-vancouver-2023.pdf2023 Survey of Licensed Child Care Spaces and Policies in Metro Vancouver This document presents the findings of an inventory of licensed child are spaces and a region-wide survey of policies and regulation relating to the provision of child care spaces.
Regional Food System Action Plan 2016https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/regional-food-system-action-plan.pdfRegional Food System Action Plan 2016The Regional Food System Strategy (RFSS) was adopted by Metro Vancouver in 2011, with a vision to create, “a sustainable, resilient and healthy food system that will contribute to the well-being of all residents and the economic prosperity of the region while conserving our ecological legacy.”
Knotweed Best Management Practiceshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/knotweeds-best-management-practices.pdfKnotweed Best Management PracticesNative to regions in Asia, knotweeds were first introduced to British Columbia in 1901 as a cultivated horticultural specimen (Barney 2006). In the last few decades knotweeds have gained attention as one of the 100 worst invasive species in the world (Lowe, Browne and Boudjelas 2000). They are included as one of the top ten invasive species for control in BC (Invasive Species Council of British Columbia 2017) and they are high priority species for management in the Metro Vancouver region.
American Bullfrog Fact Sheethttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/american-bullfrog-fact-sheet.pdfAmerican Bullfrog Fact SheetAmerican bullfrogs are large, robust frogs native to eastern North America that have become well established on BC’s south coast. First introduced as a delicacy for human consumption, they have since escaped or been released into natural areas in the Metro Vancouver region. Bullfrogs reproduce rapidly and thrive in human-disturbed habitats, allowing these invasive amphibians to establish and spread quickly. They are voracious predators that eat a variety of prey, including smaller bullfrogs and other frog species
European Fire Ant Best Management Practiceshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/european-fire-ants-best-management-practices.pdfEuropean Fire Ant Best Management PracticesThe European fire ant was first recorded in British Columbia in 2010. It has impacted many communities in Metro Vancouver, and several other areas in the province. Its distinctive swarming and stinging behaviour has given it high profile as one of the region’s most alarming invasive species.
Himalayan Blackberry Best Management Practiceshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/himalayan-blackberry-best-practices-management.pdfHimalayan Blackberry Best Management PracticesHimalayan blackberry was first introduced in British Columbia in the nineteenth century as a berry crop, but has more recently been recognized as an invasive species. Academic institutions, government, and non-government organizations continue to study this species in British Columbia.
Poison Hemlock Fact Sheethttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/poison-hemlock-fact-sheet.pdfPoison Hemlock Fact SheetPoison hemlock is one of the world’s most poisonous plants. Originally from Europe and North Africa, it is thought to be the plant that killed Socrates in 399 B.C. It prefers to grow along streams, ditches, roadsides, trails, forest edges, fields, and other previously-disturbed areas.
Japanese Beetle Fact Sheethttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/japanese-beetle-factsheet.pdfJapanese Beetle Fact SheetInvasive species have significant impacts on the environment, human health, infrastructure and the economy in the Metro Vancouver region. Japanese beetle was first detected in BC in 2017 in the False Creek area of Vancouver. Given the potential widespread impact of this pest, many agencies and individuals are involved in a collaborative effort to prevent Japanese beetle from becoming widespread in the Metro Vancouver region.
Metro 2050 Implementation Guideline - Extension of Regional Sewerage Serviceshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-2050-implementation-guideline-regional-growth-strategy-extension-of-regional-sewerage-services.pdfMetro 2050 Implementation Guideline - Extension of Regional Sewerage ServicesThis Metro 2050 Implementation Guideline provides guidance to member jurisdictions on sewerage area amendment applications as they relate to Metro 2050. Specifically, this Implementation Guideline outlines the process for evaluating and approving sewerage area amendment applications.
Orange Hawkweed Fact Sheethttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/orange-hawkweed-fact-sheet.pdfOrange Hawkweed Fact SheetThousands of hawkweed species are known worldwide, including a few native to BC. Orange hawkweed is one of many invasive hawkweeds, but it is the only one in BC with orange flowers. It was introduced from Northern and Central Europe in the 1800s as an ornamental and medicinal plant.
Spurge Laurel Fact Sheethttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/spurge-laurel-fact-sheet.pdfSpurge Laurel Fact SheetSpurge laurel, an evergreen shrub from Eurasia, northern Africa and the Mediterranean regions, was introduced to North America as a garden plant. It is long-lived, able to spread long distances by seed, and commonly found growing in gardens or under trees in forests.
Metro Vancouver Costs of Providing Infrastructure and Services to Different Residential Densities Study 2023https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/costs-of-providing-infrastructure-and-services-to-different-residential-densities.pdfMetro Vancouver Costs of Providing Infrastructure and Services to Different Residential Densities Study 2023A foundational principle of Metro 2050 is directing growth to the right places. This includes the efficient provision and use of infrastructure, increasing transit ridership, and protecting natural and agricultural areas, while supporting the building of compact complete communities. To better understand the costs and revenues associated with “urban” versus “sprawl” residential development in the region, Metro Vancouver completed a study exploring municipal infrastructure capital and operating costs for different residential forms and densities, and property taxation and utility fees on a per unit and per capita basis.
Metro Vancouver Tree Regulations Toolkithttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-vancouver-tree-regulations-toolkit.pdfMetro Vancouver Tree Regulations ToolkitThis toolkit is a resource for municipal staff, decision makers, and other practitioners, including planners, arborists, biologists, engineers, and landscape architects. This toolkit provides a framework for selecting regulatory tools to help achieve municipal tree preservation or canopy growth objectives.
Transit-Oriented Affordable Housing (TOAH) Study Phase 2 - Reducing the Barrier of High Land Cost 2019https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/reducing-barrier-high-land-cost.pdfTransit-Oriented Affordable Housing (TOAH) Study Phase 2 - Reducing the Barrier of High Land Cost 2019This report mainly focuses on affordable, transit-oriented rental housing. To explore possible solutions to the affordable rental housing challenge, in 2017 Metro Vancouver entered into a partnership with BC Housing, BC Non Profit Housing Association, TransLink, Vancity Credit Union, the Urban Development Institute, the BC Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing, and CMHC to try to tackle the challenge of affordable rental housing supply, especially in locations with good access to public transit. This all-hands-on-deck response is indicative of the magnitude of the problem and the recognition by the public, private, and non-profit sectors of the need for action.
Hedge Bindweed Best Management Practiceshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/hedge-bindweed-best-practices-management.pdfHedge Bindweed Best Management PracticesHedge bindweed (Calystegia sepium subsp. sepium) is a familiar sight from spring until fall in urban natural areas and gardens in Metro Vancouver. It is found twining around other plants and structures, often forming a tangled mass (Melymuka & Bradtke, 2013). It is a persistent plant that spreads by underground stems and roots that can resprout from fragments of these structures left in the soil.
Ecological Health Framework 2018https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/ecological-health-framework.pdfEcological Health Framework 2018Ensuring ecological health is one of the priorities identified in Metro Vancouver’s Sustainability Framework. In the Framework, Metro Vancouver commits to protect and restore an interconnected network of habitat and green space.
What Works - Securing Affordable and Special Needs Housing through Housing Agreementshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/securing-affordable-and-special-needs-housing-through-housing-agreements.pdfWhat Works - Securing Affordable and Special Needs Housing through Housing AgreementsThis award-winning (Planning Institute of British Columbia, 2020) resource guide from the “What Works” series provides information to support local governments as they develop Housing Agreements to secure affordable and special needs housing.
Regional Tree Canopy Cover and Impervious Surfaces 2019https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/ecological-health-tree-canopy-cover-impervious-surfaces.pdfRegional Tree Canopy Cover and Impervious Surfaces 2019This report contains an analysis of the tree canopy cover and impervious surfaces in Metro Vancouver. Measuring tree canopy cover is a relatively simple way to determine the extent of the urban forest and the magnitude of services it provides. Impervious surfaces are associated with many of the negative effects of urbanization such as increased temperatures (the ‘Urban Heat Island’ effect) and flood risk, along with impacts to stream health through disrupted hydrological cycles and poor water quality.
Metro 2050 Map 2 - Regional Land Use Designationshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-2050-map-2.pdfMetro 2050 Map 2 - Regional Land Use DesignationsView the Regional Growth Strategy - Regional Land Use Designations map.
English Holly Best Management Practiceshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/english-holly-best-management-practices.pdfEnglish Holly Best Management PracticesNative to Europe, northern Africa and Asia, English holly (Ilex aquifolium) is prized and grown for its bright red berries and spiny, dark green evergreen foliage. It has been widely used in gardens and is still farmed commercially for decorations, floral arrangements and as a landscape plant in the Pacific Northwest. Holly is grown on farms on Vancouver Island, the Sunshine Coast and the Fraser Valley.
Metro 2050 Implementation Guideline Regional Growth Strategy Amendmentshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-2050-implementation-guideline-regional-growth-strategy-amendments.pdfMetro 2050 Implementation Guideline Regional Growth Strategy AmendmentsMetro 2050 may be amended from time to time to maintain consistency between local and regional land use designations, plans, and targets. This implementation guideline provides information on Regional Growth Strategy amendment types, common examples, submission requirements, and process details.
Design Guidebook for Maximizing Climate Adaptation Benefits with Treeshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/design-guide-book-maximizing-climate-adaptation.pdfDesign Guidebook for Maximizing Climate Adaptation Benefits with TreesAs a companion to the Urban Forest Climate Adaptation Framework, this guidebook provides illustrations and technical guidance to support the tree plantings that maximize climate adaptation benefits throughout Metro Vancouver.
English and Irish Ivies Fact Sheethttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/english-and-irish-ivies-fact-sheet.pdfEnglish and Irish Ivies Fact SheetThere are two species of ivy present in Metro Vancouver – English ivy and Irish ivy. Both were introduced from Europe and western Asia as garden groundcover plants. Ivy can cover the forest floor and engulf trees, and is considered a serious invasive plant in the Metro Vancouver region. Unfortunately, many garden centres still sell several varieties of ivy.
European Fire Ants Fact Sheethttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/european-fire-ants-fact-sheet.pdfEuropean Fire Ants Fact SheetEuropean fire ants were first recorded in British Columbia in 2010, and they have since impacted many communities across Metro Vancouver. They are often spread through human activities, nesting in garden and landscape materials. These ants react quickly and aggressively to defend their nest. With their distinctive swarming and stinging behaviour, they are one of the most concerning invasive species in the region.
Giant Hogweed Fact Sheethttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/giant-hogweed-fact-sheet.pdfGiant Hogweed Fact SheetGiant hogweed is one of the highest priority invasive plants to control in the Metro Vancouver region because it is toxic. It can grow under a variety of conditions, but prefers to grow in wet areas in parks, forest edges, gardens and along streams.
Regional Industrial Lands Strategy Reporthttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/regional-industrial-lands-strategy-report.pdfRegional Industrial Lands Strategy ReportIndustrial lands are crucial to supporting a prosperous and sustainable regional economy. Industrial lands accommodate over one-quarter of the region’s total employment, and contribute to the region’s economic well-being, along with important linkages to transportation, trade, and taxation matters. Across the region, Metro Vancouver’s industrial lands serve as home to a wide range of employment activities that, in turn, play a crucial role in supporting the broader regional, provincial, and national economies.
Reed Canarygrass Best Management Practiceshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/reed-canarygrass-best-management-practices.pdfReed Canarygrass Best Management PracticesThe status of reed canarygrass is complicated – there has been confusion about whether the species is entirely introduced or whether it is native to the Pacific Northwest and has expanded its range through human intervention.
Metro 2050 Map 4 - Urban Centres and Frequent Transit Development Areashttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-2050-map-4.pdfMetro 2050 Map 4 - Urban Centres and Frequent Transit Development AreasView the Regional Growth Strategy - Urban Centres and Frequent Transit Development Areas map.
Connecting the Dots: Regional Green Infrastructure Network Resource Guidehttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/connecting-the-dots.pdfConnecting the Dots: Regional Green Infrastructure Network Resource GuideThe Connecting the Dots Resource guide supports the developing Regional Green Infrastructure Network Strategy of Metro Vancouver. This document provides the different forms of green infrastructure and how it provides integrated benefits across the regional landscape.
Regional Food System Strategy 2011https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/regional-food-system-strategy.pdfRegional Food System Strategy 2011The Regional Food System Strategy is focused on how actions at the regional level can moves us toward a sustainable, resilient and healthy food system while recognizing that the Metro Vancouver foods system is affected by influences at the global scale.
Metro 2050 Implementation Guideline - Regional Context Statementshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-2050-implementation-guideline-regional-context-statements.pdfMetro 2050 Implementation Guideline - Regional Context StatementsThe Metro 2050 Implementation Guideline - Regional Context Statements provides guidance to member jurisdictions on the development, submission, and acceptance for Regional Context Statements.
Himalayan Balsam Best Management Practiceshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/himalayan-balsam-best-practices-management.pdfHimalayan Balsam Best Management PracticesHimalayan balsam is native to the Western Himalayas, most likely brought to Canada in the early 1900s as an ornamental plant. Its high reproductive output, early germination, rich nectar production, hardiness, rapid growth and habitat preference have allowed the species to spread rapidly, dominate landscapes, and compete with and displace native plant species.
Spurge Laurel Best Management Practiceshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/spurge-laurel-best-management-practices.pdfSpurge Laurel Best Management PracticesSpurge laurel is a perennial evergreen shrub native to Eurasia, northern Africa and the Mediterranean region that was introduced to North America as an ornamental plant. Caution must be exercised when managing this species due to toxins that can cause health impacts in human and animals, including death if ingested.
English and Irish Ivies Best Management Practiceshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/english-and-irish-ivies-best-management-practices.pdfEnglish and Irish Ivies Best Management PracticesEnglish ivy (Hedera helix) and Irish ivy (Hedera hibernica) are native to Europe and western Asia. English ivy was introduced to North America during the earliest days of colonialism (Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International, 2018) and has become increasingly problematic in natural and human-altered landscapes throughout the Metro Vancouver region. Ivy spreads vegetatively and by seed and it tolerates a wide range of soil, moisture and light conditions. Ivy’s ability to take over forest understories, suppress the growth of native species, and alter the tree canopy makes it a serious invader.

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