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Resources and Studies

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This resources and studies section contains key projects and studies completed by Regional Planning in recent years. Although this is not a comprehensive list, if you do not see the project you are looking for please contact regionalplanning@metrovancouver.org to request further information or resources.
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Urban Tree List for Metro Vancouver in a Changing Climate https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/urban-forest-trees-list.pdfUrban Tree List for Metro Vancouver in a Changing Climate An easy to download and print list of over 300 tree species assessed for suitability to the current and projected future climate in the Metro Vancouver region. Essentially a short version of the trees listed in the database.
Metro 2050https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-2050.pdfMetro 2050Metro Vancouver’s Regional Growth Strategy, Metro 2050, is a long-range vision for how the region will manage population, dwelling unit, and employment growth forecasted to come to this region over the next 30 years. It contains goals, strategies, and policies to shape and accommodate growth in a way that supports the development of a compact urban area and complete communities, and which protects important lands such as Conservation and Recreation, Agricultural, Industrial, and Rural lands.
Metro Vancouver Growth Projections 2021https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-vancouver-growth-projections-tables.pdfMetro Vancouver Growth Projections 2021Vew the Metro Vancouver Growth Projections. This includes population, dwelling unit, employment, and geography.
Metro 2050 Mapshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-2050-maps.pdfMetro 2050 MapsView Metro 2050, the Regional Growth Strategy maps.
Metro Vancouver Housing Data Book 2023https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-vancouver-housing-data-book-2023.pdfMetro Vancouver Housing Data Book 2023The Metro Vancouver Housing Data Book brings together a large collection of regional and municipal level data from a variety of sources in order to provide a comprehensive look at the region's housing market and the people impacted by it.
European Chafer Beetle Best Management Practiceshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/european-chafer-beetle-best-management-practices.pdfEuropean Chafer Beetle Best Management PracticesAs researchers and practitioners learn more about the biology and control of European chafer beetle in British Columbia, it is anticipated that the recommended best management practices may change over time and this document will be updated.
Ecological Health Framework 2018https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/ecological-health-framework.pdfEcological Health Framework 2018Ensuring ecological health is one of the priorities identified in Metro Vancouver’s Sustainability Framework. In the Framework, Metro Vancouver commits to protect and restore an interconnected network of habitat and green space.
Invasive Species and Toxic Plant Disposal Options for Practitioners and Commercial Customershttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/invasive-species-toxic-plant-disposal-options.pdfInvasive Species and Toxic Plant Disposal Options for Practitioners and Commercial CustomersThe following list is intended for use by practitioners and commercial customers, not by residents. Residents who wish to dispose of invasive plants or soil containing invasive species should contact their municipality directly for disposal advice.
Metro Vancouver Growth Projections - Methodology Report 2021https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-vancouver-growth-projections-methodology-report.pdfMetro Vancouver Growth Projections - Methodology Report 2021Projection modelling is intended to promote collaboration and consistency among provincial, regional, and municipal planning agencies and establish a common basis of information, assumptiosn, and growth and policy implementation methods. This methodology report was created in 2021.
Metro 2050 Map 3 - Urban Containment Boundary and General Urban Landshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-2050-map-3.pdfMetro 2050 Map 3 - Urban Containment Boundary and General Urban LandsView the Regional Growth Strategy - Urban Containment Boundary and General Urban Lands map.
Japanese Beetle Guidebookhttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/japanese-beetle-guidebook.pdfJapanese Beetle GuidebookThe impacts of invasive species on ecological, human, and economic health are of concern in the Metro Vancouver region. Successful control of invasive species requires concerted and targeted efforts by many participants. This document - “Guidebook for Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) in the Metro Vancouver Region” - is one of a series of species-specific guides developed for use by practitioners (e.g., local government staff, crews, project managers, contractors, consultants, developers, stewardship groups, and others who have a role in invasive species management) in this region.
Regional Food System Strategy 2011https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/regional-food-system-strategy.pdfRegional Food System Strategy 2011The Regional Food System Strategy is focused on how actions at the regional level can moves us toward a sustainable, resilient and healthy food system while recognizing that the Metro Vancouver foods system is affected by influences at the global scale.
European Chafer Beetle Fact Sheethttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/european-chafer-beetle-fact-sheet.pdfEuropean Chafer Beetle Fact SheetEuropean chafer beetles were first discovered in British Columbia in 2001 in lawns and turfgrass. They have since spread across the Metro Vancouver region. The beetles can spread quickly because they have a short life cycle and can fly. They can also be spread in infested soil, grass and garden plants.
Himalayan Blackberry Fact Sheethttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/himalayan-blackberry-fact-sheet.pdfHimalayan Blackberry Fact SheetHimalayan blackberry was first introduced to BC as a berry crop. This plant can grow almost anywhere. It spreads by seed (from birds and people spreading berries) and by rooting from stems that touch the ground. As a result, it is one of the most widespread invasive plants in Metro Vancouver.
Metro 2050 Executive Summaryhttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-2050-executive-summary.pdfMetro 2050 Executive SummaryAn executive summary of Metro 2050, the Regional Growth Strategy. This 4-page document provides an overview of the vision, principles, goals, strategies, targets, and new policies in Metro 2050.
Metro 2050 Map 1 - Metro Vancouver Regionhttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-2050-map-1.pdfMetro 2050 Map 1 - Metro Vancouver RegionView the Regional Growth Strategy - Metro Vancouver Region map.
Knotweed Best Management Practiceshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/knotweeds-best-management-practices.pdfKnotweed Best Management PracticesNative to regions in Asia, knotweeds were first introduced to British Columbia in 1901 as a cultivated horticultural specimen (Barney 2006). In the last few decades knotweeds have gained attention as one of the 100 worst invasive species in the world (Lowe, Browne and Boudjelas 2000). They are included as one of the top ten invasive species for control in BC (Invasive Species Council of British Columbia 2017) and they are high priority species for management in the Metro Vancouver region.
Board Report re Updating Metro 2040https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/board-report-updating-metro-2040.pdfBoard Report re Updating Metro 2040A Metro 2050 report, seeking Board endorsement to initiate a comprehensive update to Metro Vancouver 2040: Shaping our Future, and to participate in TransLink’s spring 2019 consultation on developing a vision and values for the future of the region as potential input into that update.
English and Irish Ivies Fact Sheethttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/english-and-irish-ivies-fact-sheet.pdfEnglish and Irish Ivies Fact SheetThere are two species of ivy present in Metro Vancouver – English ivy and Irish ivy. Both were introduced from Europe and western Asia as garden groundcover plants. Ivy can cover the forest floor and engulf trees, and is considered a serious invasive plant in the Metro Vancouver region. Unfortunately, many garden centres still sell several varieties of ivy.
Metro 2050 Map 2 - Regional Land Use Designationshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-2050-map-2.pdfMetro 2050 Map 2 - Regional Land Use DesignationsView the Regional Growth Strategy - Regional Land Use Designations map.
What Works - Securing Affordable and Special Needs Housing through Housing Agreementshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/securing-affordable-and-special-needs-housing-through-housing-agreements.pdfWhat Works - Securing Affordable and Special Needs Housing through Housing AgreementsThis award-winning (Planning Institute of British Columbia, 2020) resource guide from the “What Works” series provides information to support local governments as they develop Housing Agreements to secure affordable and special needs housing.
Japanese Beetle Fact Sheethttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/japanese-beetle-factsheet.pdfJapanese Beetle Fact SheetInvasive species have significant impacts on the environment, human health, infrastructure and the economy in the Metro Vancouver region. Japanese beetle was first detected in BC in 2017 in the False Creek area of Vancouver. Given the potential widespread impact of this pest, many agencies and individuals are involved in a collaborative effort to prevent Japanese beetle from becoming widespread in the Metro Vancouver region.
Regional Industrial Lands Strategy Reporthttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/regional-industrial-lands-strategy-report.pdfRegional Industrial Lands Strategy ReportIndustrial lands are crucial to supporting a prosperous and sustainable regional economy. Industrial lands accommodate over one-quarter of the region’s total employment, and contribute to the region’s economic well-being, along with important linkages to transportation, trade, and taxation matters. Across the region, Metro Vancouver’s industrial lands serve as home to a wide range of employment activities that, in turn, play a crucial role in supporting the broader regional, provincial, and national economies.
Metro Vancouver Costs of Providing Infrastructure and Services to Different Residential Densities Study 2023https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/costs-of-providing-infrastructure-and-services-to-different-residential-densities.pdfMetro Vancouver Costs of Providing Infrastructure and Services to Different Residential Densities Study 2023A foundational principle of Metro 2050 is directing growth to the right places. This includes the efficient provision and use of infrastructure, increasing transit ridership, and protecting natural and agricultural areas, while supporting the building of compact complete communities. To better understand the costs and revenues associated with “urban” versus “sprawl” residential development in the region, Metro Vancouver completed a study exploring municipal infrastructure capital and operating costs for different residential forms and densities, and property taxation and utility fees on a per unit and per capita basis.
Metro Vancouver Agriculture Awareness Grants Recipients 2008-2017https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/agriculture-awareness-grants-recipients-brochure.pdfMetro Vancouver Agriculture Awareness Grants Recipients 2008-2017Metro Vancouver has been involved in agriculture awareness since 1994 to raise public understanding about local food and the importance of agriculture in this region. The grant program started in 2008 and has supported both new innovative pilot proj-ects and ongoing educational programs.
Metro 2050 Map 5 - Major Transit Growth Corridors and Major Transit Networkhttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-2050-map-5.pdfMetro 2050 Map 5 - Major Transit Growth Corridors and Major Transit NetworkView the Regional Growth Strategy - Major Transit Growth Corridors and Major Transit Network map.
Regional Parking Study Technical Reporthttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/regional-parking-study-technical-report.pdfRegional Parking Study Technical ReportA Regional Parking Study Technical Report.
Food Flows in Metro Vancouver Executive Summary 2020https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/food-flows-in-metro-vancouver-executive-summary.pdfFood Flows in Metro Vancouver Executive Summary 2020The Food Flows in Metro Vancouver study estimates the volume and value of food imported and exported from the Metro Vancouver region and the methods used to transport this food to and from international sources, the US, other provinces and within BC.
Knotweeds Fact Sheethttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/knotweeds-fact-sheet.pdfKnotweeds Fact SheetKnotweeds are aggressive plants that were introduced from regions in Asia. They are some of the most destructive invasive plants in the world and are considered a high priority to manage.
Regional Land Cover Classification and Sensitive Ecosystem Inventory Update - Technical Report 2020https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/mv-land-cover-classification-sei-update-2022.pdfRegional Land Cover Classification and Sensitive Ecosystem Inventory Update - Technical Report 2020The Metro Vancouver Land Cover Classification (LCC) and Sensitive Ecosystem Inventory (SEI) datasets are critical spatial products for regional operations and planning. They represent baseline information required for developing regional land-use plans, monitoring regional growth and land use change, and implementing land use management operations.
Health Impact Assessment (HIA) of Transportation and Land Use Activities: Toolkithttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/health-impact-assessment-toolkit.pdfHealth Impact Assessment (HIA) of Transportation and Land Use Activities: ToolkitA companion document for the HIA Guidebook, the Toolkit provides templates, checklists and worksheets to streamline the HIA process.
What Works: Affordable Housing Initiatives in Metro Vancouver Municipalitieshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/affordable-housing-initiatives-in-metro-vancouver-municipalities.pdfWhat Works: Affordable Housing Initiatives in Metro Vancouver MunicipalitiesThis resource guide from the “What Works” series provides information for municipalities on effective municipal measures for facilitating affordable housing, including some local examples of successful municipal initiatives.
Metro 2050 Implementation Guideline - Regional Context Statementshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-2050-implementation-guideline-regional-context-statements.pdfMetro 2050 Implementation Guideline - Regional Context StatementsThe Metro 2050 Implementation Guideline - Regional Context Statements provides guidance to member jurisdictions on the development, submission, and acceptance for Regional Context Statements.
Stratification of Industrial Land in Metro Vancouver 2018https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/stratification-of-industria-land-in-metro-vancouver.pdfStratification of Industrial Land in Metro Vancouver 2018Metro Vancouver is coordinating the development of a Regional Industrial Lands Strategy. The Strategy will provide a vision for the future of industrial lands in Metro Vancouver and actions for achieving the vision. This was created in September 2018.
Metro 2050 Implementation Guideline - Industrial and Employment Landshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-2050-implementation-guideline-industrial-and-employment-lands.pdfMetro 2050 Implementation Guideline - Industrial and Employment LandsThe Metro 2050 Implementation Guideline – Industrial and Employment Lands provides guidance on industrial land objectives, as well as how planning policies, market conditions, site locations, industrial sectors, and local contexts all influence the implementation of these objectives.
Wild Chervil Fact Sheethttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/wild-chervil-fact-sheet.pdfWild Chervil Fact SheetWild chervil was introduced from Europe, likely in wildflower seed mixes. It has deep taproots and forms new plant buds from the base of the stems, which make control difficult. In BC, wild chervil is most common in the Fraser Valley but is becoming established in Metro Vancouver.
English Holly Best Management Practiceshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/english-holly-best-management-practices.pdfEnglish Holly Best Management PracticesNative to Europe, northern Africa and Asia, English holly (Ilex aquifolium) is prized and grown for its bright red berries and spiny, dark green evergreen foliage. It has been widely used in gardens and is still farmed commercially for decorations, floral arrangements and as a landscape plant in the Pacific Northwest. Holly is grown on farms on Vancouver Island, the Sunshine Coast and the Fraser Valley.
Feasibility of Targeted Invasive Plant Grazing in Metro Vancouver Technical Reporthttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/feasibility-of-targeted-invasive-plant-grazing-in-metro-vancouver.pdfFeasibility of Targeted Invasive Plant Grazing in Metro Vancouver Technical ReportThis report assesses the feasibility of targeted invasive plant grazing in Metro Vancouver, reviewing the efficacy, challenges, and considerations of targeted grazing treatments for control of invasive plants. Fourteen targeted grazing practitioners were interviewed to assess the operational feasibility of targeted grazing treatments.
Metro 2050 Implementation Guideline Regional Growth Strategy Amendmentshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/metro-2050-implementation-guideline-regional-growth-strategy-amendments.pdfMetro 2050 Implementation Guideline Regional Growth Strategy AmendmentsMetro 2050 may be amended from time to time to maintain consistency between local and regional land use designations, plans, and targets. This implementation guideline provides information on Regional Growth Strategy amendment types, common examples, submission requirements, and process details.
Regional Industrial Lands Strategy Executive Summaryhttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/regional-industrial-lands-strategy-executive-summary.pdfRegional Industrial Lands Strategy Executive SummaryThe Metro Vancouver region is experiencing a critical shortage of industrial land. Continued population and employment growth in a constrained geography have contributed to the challenges facing Metro Vancouver’s industrial land supply. With strong demand for industrial space, many industrial businesses are finding it increasingly difficult to find suitable space to operate in this region.
Regional Tree Canopy Cover and Impervious Surfaces 2019https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/ecological-health-tree-canopy-cover-impervious-surfaces.pdfRegional Tree Canopy Cover and Impervious Surfaces 2019This report contains an analysis of the tree canopy cover and impervious surfaces in Metro Vancouver. Measuring tree canopy cover is a relatively simple way to determine the extent of the urban forest and the magnitude of services it provides. Impervious surfaces are associated with many of the negative effects of urbanization such as increased temperatures (the ‘Urban Heat Island’ effect) and flood risk, along with impacts to stream health through disrupted hydrological cycles and poor water quality.
Help Stop the Spread of Invasive Plants - Brochurehttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/invasive-plant-brochure.PDFHelp Stop the Spread of Invasive Plants - BrochureMany plants have been introduced to this region from other continents. Some of these plants are considered ‘invasive’ because the predators and diseases from their native regions are not here to keep them under control, so they spread rapidly and can cause many problems.
Himalayan Balsam Best Management Practiceshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/himalayan-balsam-best-practices-management.pdfHimalayan Balsam Best Management PracticesHimalayan balsam is native to the Western Himalayas, most likely brought to Canada in the early 1900s as an ornamental plant. Its high reproductive output, early germination, rich nectar production, hardiness, rapid growth and habitat preference have allowed the species to spread rapidly, dominate landscapes, and compete with and displace native plant species.
Himalayan Blackberry Best Management Practiceshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/himalayan-blackberry-best-practices-management.pdfHimalayan Blackberry Best Management PracticesHimalayan blackberry was first introduced in British Columbia in the nineteenth century as a berry crop, but has more recently been recognized as an invasive species. Academic institutions, government, and non-government organizations continue to study this species in British Columbia.
Poison Hemlock Fact Sheethttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/poison-hemlock-fact-sheet.pdfPoison Hemlock Fact SheetPoison hemlock is one of the world’s most poisonous plants. Originally from Europe and North Africa, it is thought to be the plant that killed Socrates in 399 B.C. It prefers to grow along streams, ditches, roadsides, trails, forest edges, fields, and other previously-disturbed areas.
A Review of Social Equity in Regional Growth Management – Phase 1 Report 2019https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/social-equity-in-regional-growth-management-ecoplan-report-metro-vancouver.pdfA Review of Social Equity in Regional Growth Management – Phase 1 Report 2019This report examines the concept of social equity as it relates to regional growth management policy and planning. It includes a review of 12 other regional planning agencies that are considering the concept of social equity in regional planning work, a gap analysis of Metro 2040, and some recommendations for Metro Vancouver.
English and Irish Ivies Best Management Practiceshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/english-and-irish-ivies-best-management-practices.pdfEnglish and Irish Ivies Best Management PracticesEnglish ivy (Hedera helix) and Irish ivy (Hedera hibernica) are native to Europe and western Asia. English ivy was introduced to North America during the earliest days of colonialism (Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International, 2018) and has become increasingly problematic in natural and human-altered landscapes throughout the Metro Vancouver region. Ivy spreads vegetatively and by seed and it tolerates a wide range of soil, moisture and light conditions. Ivy’s ability to take over forest understories, suppress the growth of native species, and alter the tree canopy makes it a serious invader.
European Fire Ant Best Management Practiceshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/european-fire-ants-best-management-practices.pdfEuropean Fire Ant Best Management PracticesThe European fire ant was first recorded in British Columbia in 2010. It has impacted many communities in Metro Vancouver, and several other areas in the province. Its distinctive swarming and stinging behaviour has given it high profile as one of the region’s most alarming invasive species.
Regional Planning Bulletin March 2023https://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/regional-planning-bulletin-march-issue-2023.pdfRegional Planning Bulletin March 2023View the Regional Planning Bulletin March 2023 Issue. This is a quarterly newsletter regarding Metro Vancouver Regional Planning projects.
Reed Canarygrass Best Management Practiceshttps://metrovancouver.org/services/regional-planning/Documents/reed-canarygrass-best-management-practices.pdfReed Canarygrass Best Management PracticesThe status of reed canarygrass is complicated – there has been confusion about whether the species is entirely introduced or whether it is native to the Pacific Northwest and has expanded its range through human intervention.

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